Unexpected circumstances led to The Tallinn Architecture Biennale announcing a new winner for its Installation Programme Competition: Fungible Non-Fungible Pavillionby Iheartblob. This new “decentralized, systematic” approach to architectural design allows both investors and designers to collaborate to create a structure that changes over time. 

Simulaa and Natalie Alima, an Australian couple, were announced as the winners in the 2022 Tallinn Architecture Biennale pavilion contest with an installation of mushrooms. Burasite is the name of the structure. It was built using 3D printing technology and would have been covered in mycelia over time. The proposal highlighted the idea of recycling and reusing local materials and how humans can make sustainable designs through invention and adaptation. Unexpected circumstances caused the duo to withdraw their entry from the competition.

Courtesy of iheartblob

Courtesy of iheartblob

The new winning proposal changed the role of an architect. He was no longer a “Master Builder”, but a “system designer”. This means that he combines innovation with local craftsmanship to empower the communities using blockchain. The pavilion, which is believed to be the first blockchain-funded architecture project, was created by NFT’s, AI and will serve as an architectural model that places emphasis on the community and environmental awareness.

This allows the pavilion design to evolve in both digital and physical media. iheartblob developed a NFT generative tool that allows users to create and “mint,” their own structures, instead of having to design them. In order to properly calculate material and fabrication costs, the pavilion uses a set of constraints. This includes grid systems, interlocking components and timber materiality. The tool generates a NFT that funds a physical replica of the pavilion. As a way for community designers to make a profit on their creations, the owners can sell the digital objects on secondary marketplaces.

Courtesy of iheartblob

The pavilion will eventually be made up of unique pieces created by different owners and designers. This would reflect a diverse and inclusive community. From May 1st to July 1st, the online application for design will be available. Construction is scheduled to start. The installation will be constructed on the green pedestrian area facing Museum of Estonian Architecture between July and August. It will open to the public on the 7th of September and remain there until the 2024 edition.

Courtesy of iheartblob

The theme Edible. Or, The Architecture of Metabolism. The 6th edition of TAB examines how the natural world can inform the circle economy. It also highlights the relationship between cities and buildings and the natural world. Areti Markopoulou and Lydia Kallipoliti, architects, shared the stage with Ivan Sergejev. They explained how the event aims to foster local craftsmanship, improve materials utilization, respond to long-term environments and enhance bespoke design expression.