Paul Clemence, an architectural photographer, has published a series of photoseries showing the Kunsthaus Zurich Extension designed by David Chipperfield architects. The extension, which is a freestanding addition, houses the Kunsthaus Zurich Museum Extension, a collection that includes classic modernist artworks, the Buhrle Collection, and temporary exhibits. It draws inspiration from the traditional stone façades of the Kunsthaus and other important public buildings in Switzerland. The architectural identity combines tradition with innovation using slender vertical fins made from Jurassic limestone.

© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence

Kunsthaus Zurich, which now has four buildings, is the largest Swiss art museum. It includes the Moser building (1910) and the Pfister Building (1958), as well as the Muller building (1976) and the Chipperfield extension (202020). The architects responsible for the design of the museum stated that the urban concept was built on “placing a clear geometric volume at the northern edge” of the square. The historic cantonal school, located just north of the site in 1842 inspired the structure’s design. The urban frame is defined by the school, which allowed for the creation of two new spaces: the urban square to south, which was surrounded on all four sides with buildings, and the Garden of Art to north.

© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence
© Paul Clemence